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There’s No Diabetes in Baseball…or Is There?

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Brandon Morrow, Major League Pitcher for the San Diego Padres, has had Type 1 or Juvenile Diabetes since he was a senior in high school.

“I would never think that diabetes affects my ability to locate a fastball, or anything,” said Morrow, who has a 3.15 ERA through his first three starts this season.

How does he manage it? Hours before he throws the first pitch, Morrow will begin regulating his blood sugar levels, as he does every day. He pricks a finger, providing a small blood sample to a glucose meter. He’ll repeat the process several times, including before and after his pre-game bullpen session.

About an hour-and-a-half prior to his start, he’ll eat a protein bar.

“It has the carbs I want in it,” Morrow said. “I know it’s going to break down slowly and it’s going to fill me up a little bit.”

Morrow wears an insulin pump, which supplies small amounts of insulin throughout the day and more when necessary, but he sheds it when he pitches. During his freshman year at Cal, Morrow tried wearing the pump during a couple of games but found the device, clipped to his belt and connected to a catheter, uncomfortable. So he continues checking his blood sugar after each inning, providing insulin as needed.

“It’s almost like a subconscious thing you don’t really think about,” Morrow said. “You come back in, check your blood sugar, prick your finger, get some blood and be on your way.”

Morrow realizes that Type 1 diabetes, typically diagnosed in adolescence, presents a more difficult challenge for someone lacking his experience.

“If someone comes up or leaves their information, I try to reach out to them,” Morrow, 30, said.

“Whenever someone wants to talk about it, I’m very open about it. I like to help people feel like they can still do what they want to do. They have diabetes, which can be life-changing, but at the same time, if they’re under control, it can be the same.

“You can use it to your advantage,” Morrow added, “because you’re more conscious of what you’re putting in your body.”

Reserved by nature, Morrow has become one of professional sports’ more visible advocates for diabetes awareness. He’s involved with JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) and often has spoken to aspiring big-leaguers with diabetes. His Twitter stream largely consists of retweets of articles about diabetes and messages of encouragement to those affected by the same condition.

“It’s nice to show another part of the country, get comfortable there and bring awareness,” said Morrow, who previously played in Toronto and Seattle. He added with a chuckle: “I guess it wasn’t our country in Canada, but they do a lot with JDRF.”

In San Diego, Morrow already has found a similarly good-natured ally. Peter Seidler, the Padres’ lead investor, discovered he had Type 1 diabetes at 32, an usually late age for a diagnosis. Years earlier, one of Seidler’s younger sisters was diagnosed with the same disease at age 10.

“As adults, we’re grown-ups and can generally deal with stuff,” Seidler, 54, said. “But a 7-year-old who has to prick his finger and put his blood on a machine, it’s uncomfortable to do that in front of classmates or on the playground. When they can see Brandon Morrow do it, it just makes a difference. …

I have a ton of respect for how he’s achieved what he has, and just the whole way he’s dealt with it.”
http://m.utsandiego.com/news/2015/apr/25/padres-brandon-morrow-pitches-with-diabetes/

Exercise Helps You Manage Diabetes

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Manage your diabetes, lose a few pounds and have greater energy just by doing some simple exercise. Regular physical activity increases metabolism, builds muscle, and supports cardiovascular health. It also helps stabilize blood sugar levels and reduces high blood pressure. Diabetics who work out have a lower risk of heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and other chronic disorders. Exercise is also good for mental well-being.

Ideally, working out at least four times a week is best to maintain your weight, improve circulation, and keep your brain sharp. For those with type II diabetes, exercise can improve insulin response and lower blood glucose levels. If you feel really unfit and have not done any exercise or workouts for a long time, it is best to start pacing yourself by just taking brisk walks or short jogs. Start with three to four times a week and focus on doing it consistently. You can always ask a friend or family member to accompany you when you exercise to keep the momentum going! Within weeks, you will realize that your body is getting fitter and healthier. Then you can move on to slightly heavier exercise routines.

 

http://arditor.com/health/diabetes/newsletter/whyexercise/exercise-1.php

Six of the Best Diabetes Diets

by Diabetes Center Miami |

What you eat plays a crucial role in how well you manage your blood sugar, avoid excess weight gain and prevent other diabetes-related complications. According to U.S. News & World Report, below are six diets endorsed by top health agencies and experts as safe and effective.

The DASH Diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is ranked as one of the top diabetes diets. The DASH Diet emphasizes whole grains, vegetables, fruit, lean protein and low-fat dairy with a reduced salt intake.

The Biggest Loser Diet is based on a simple six-week plan of eating right and incorporating more movement into your daily activities. The claim is that practicing simple techniques like portion control, using a food journal, or eating regular meals can help prevent or reverse diabetes as well as other health problems.

The Engine 2 Diet is plant-based, following claims that animal products threaten your health by clogging your arteries and raising “bad” cholesterol. Plants, conversely, provide the nutrients needed to reverse diabetes symptoms, however, the plan does cut out vegetable oils entirely.

The Flexitarian Diet is the marriage of “flexible” and “vegetarian,” suggesting that you don’t have to completely eliminate meat to reap the health benefits of plant-based foods. Flexitarian eating involves adding food groups to your diet to replace meat, like tofu, beans, lentils, eggs or other sources of protein. There’s a 3-4-5 regimen associated with the diet, where breakfast choices are around 300 calories, lunches are 400, and dinners are 500. Snacks can be about 150 calories each. Total caloric consumption on the Flexitarian Diet is ideally around 1,500 calories, depending on your age, weight, gender and activity level.

The Mayo Clinic Diet revolves around coaching dieters to have lasting healthy habits that help you reverse and avoid diabetes. With a unique food pyramid, you can recalibrate your eating habits to break bad ones and implement new and healthier choices. The claim is that you’ll lose about six to 10 pounds in two weeks, and you’ll continue to lose one to two pounds every week until you hit your goal weight. The thing that sets this diet apart from others is that you don’t count calories, and you can eat all the fruits and vegetables you want. Also, no food groups are completely off limits.

The Ornish Diet is a meal plan that emphasizes less saturated fat and cholesterol, which matches the guidelines set forth by the American Diabetes Association. The plan has been found to lower A1C levels in diabetics, which is a positive sign of better blood sugar control. Ornish eating emphasizes a “buy this, not that” methodology, helping dieters to understand that they can start somewhere and work their way up to better choices. Stress-management techniques, exercise, and emotional support are also a part of this diet’s foundation, which is a more holistic approach to disease management and weight loss.

http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/diet-and-nutrition/6-of-the-best-diabetes-diets

5 Tips for Dining out with Diabetes

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Dining out with diabetes doesn’t have to be a struggle. Whether it’s a business meeting over lunch or a multi-course, gourmet dining event, there are ways to ensure that you make smart and healthy choices while still enjoying yourself.

  1. Time it right. Balancing your blood sugar is all about consistency. Instead of getting stuck in a situation where you could be waiting a long time for a table, make reservations before you head out to eat. If you can’t do this ahead of time, bring a snack that will keep your blood sugar stable should you find yourself sitting around. Also, make sure you know how and when to adjust your insulin doses around meal times.

  1. Send back the freebies. If you’re eating at a place that offers free bread, chips, or some other type of carbohydrate-heavy snack, don’t be afraid to send it back to the kitchen. If food is sitting in front of you, you’re more likely to snack on it before your meal arrives – which could spell trouble when it comes to your overall caloric intake and blood sugar.

  1. Make your meal. Get creative with the menu if you don’t see entrees that fit your nutritional bill. A few high-protein appetizers on top of a side salad can be a meal in itself. Also, make sure to ask for substitutions or special requests, like extra vegetables instead of French fries, dressing on the side, or that your meal be made with no salt during the cooking process.

  1. Drink smart. Alcohol tends to make you eat more in general, so avoid when possible. If you are going to drink, opt for something without a high-calorie, high-sugar profile, like a glass of red wine or a vodka tonic. Make every effort not to have a “pre” drink at the bar while you’re waiting for your table – you should ideally be having it with your meal, as food slows the absorption of alcohol.
  1. Avoid the “low-fat” trap. Ordering food on the go, especially at fast food chains, cafes or coffee shops can be tricky. Know that even foods labeled “low-fat” are often still packed with sugar, calories and carbohydrates. Read labels to make sure something that seems healthy is actually a smart choice. When in doubt, opt for lean proteins, vegetables, and whole grains. While you should be concerned about your fat intake, having an egg breakfast muffin with turkey sausage, for instance, might actually be a healthier option than that “low-fat” vegan muffin.

Finally, be aware of portion sizes. In general, it’s safe to say that eating half of a restaurant meal is usually more than enough food. To avoid overeating, ask your server when you order your meal for half of it to be boxed up ahead of time.

Source: American Diabetes Association

http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/diet-and-nutrition/5-tips-for-dining-out-with-diabetes

The Non-Diabetic’s Guide to Helping Loved Ones with Diabetes

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Whether you’re a brother, mother, aunt, boyfriend, wife or best friend, knowing how to support the people in your life who live with diabetes isn’t all that easy. Here are a few tips to help you be the best support system you can possibly be.

Ask us what we need. 

Don’t lecture us.

Be patient when our blood sugars are too low or too high.

Be positive and consistent when supporting children with diabetes.

As diabetics, we have no idea what it’s like for you to love and watch us manage our diabetes. As our loved ones, you just want to take care of us, keep us safe and help us live a happy, healthy life. We truly appreciate you. The key is to be the kind of support we’re looking for. Ask us how you can be the best source of support in our lives with diabetes…but please, just don’t ask when our blood sugars are low.

Ginger Vieira has lived with Type 1 diabetes and Celiac disease since 1999. She is the author of Dealing with Diabetes Burnout, Emotional Eating with Diabetes and Your Diabetes Science Experiment.  Ginger is the Editorial Director at DiabetesDaily.

http://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/2012/06/non-diabetics-guide-to-helping-loved-ones-with-diabetes/

What’s it Like to Date Someone with Type 1 Diabetes?

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Dating a person with type 1 diabetes brings some very unique challenges to any relationship.

In this article in DiabetesDaily.com by Ginger Viera, Heidi shares her story.

Ginger: When you first began dating, did you know about his type 1 diabetes from the start or was it introduced at some point?

Heidi: I knew from the very first date. We were up too late talking like teenagers and he realized his blood was low. He excused himself to get a glass of milk and a snack. I had known him as a friend for an entire year prior. I did not know. I don’t think he would have told me right away, but the circumstances brought it to light early on.

Ginger: When you learned about his diabetes, how did you feel? Did it change anything about how you perceived him in a negative or positive way?

Heidi: I felt embarrassed that I did not know or recognize the signs that his blood sugar was low. I asked him if I should have noticed. The knowledge did not change how I felt emotionally. It did make me want to be educated.

Ginger: Was he open to talking about and teaching you about his diabetes?

Heidi: No. He wasn’t particularly open to talk about his diabetes. He was diagnosed at age 36 (he is now 44) and I truly feel he wrestles with the drastic changes that life threw at him. He did, over time, teach me how to recognize his lows, check his blood sugar, and offered suggestions on how to deal with them.

Ginger: In what ways did his diabetes come up in your relationship?

Heidi: Low blood sugar numbers are his biggest concern. He doesn’t recognize that his numbers are plummeting until they are in the 60s or lower. But more so worrisome, are the nighttime lows. I learned to test his blood at night when I would wake up to him in a full body sweat, hot, and twitchy. I kept my place stocked with juice boxes and snacks. I’ve woken up to him in convulsions once. Luckily he seems to know to swallow his juice box when a straw is in his mouth.

Once time I called the ambulance because he accidentally injected his long acting insulin into a vein. Despite a gigantic snack just before bedtime, his numbers dipped from 120 to 39 in a matter of 20 minutes. I hadn’t fallen asleep yet and noticed his body was feverishly hot. All was fine in the end and no trip to the hospital was needed. He was angry that I called the ambulance. He was upset that he could not control his own body = life.

Ginger: What was one of the most significant things you’ve learned about diabetes through watching him live with it?

Heidi: You can’t pigeon hole people. You can’t pass judgement. I get mad now when I hear people tell him “I thought you weren’t supposed to eat that.” Like myself before I met him, I knew nothing of real importance about diabetes. We hear about the effects of long terms highs, weight issues, etc., but never about their fear of going to sleep, not knowing if they will wake in the morning. It’s terrifying.

Sometimes it doesn’t matter if you do every little thing right. Your body hiccups and things don’t go the way you expect. Like passing out while being intimate or missing work because your two scoops of ice cream with chocolate sauce on top of a big dinner didn’t get you through the night and you missed a half a day’s work.

Ginger: What is one thing you wish you could understand better around diabetes or his diabetes specifically? 

Heidi: Why there are not better sources for emotional counseling. I wish I had known him before his diagnosis so I could better understand his feeling of loss. The feeling of loss he has knowing he can’t physically exert himself without worrying about passing out. The loss of knowing he will hear the wake-up alarm each morning.

http://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/2013/06/dating-a-person-with-type-1-diabetes/

The Non-Diabetic’s Guide to Helping Loved Ones with Diabetes

by Diabetes Center Miami |

hands

Whether you’re a brother, mother, aunt, boyfriend, wife or best friend, knowing how to support the people in your life who live with diabetes isn’t all that easy. Here are a few tips to help you be the best support system you can possibly be.

Ask us what we need.
Don’t lecture us.
Be patient when our blood sugars are too low or too high.
Be positive and consistent when supporting children with diabetes.

As diabetics, we have no idea what it’s like for you to love and watch us manage our diabetes. As our loved ones, you just want to take care of us, keep us safe and help us live a happy, healthy life. We truly appreciate you. The key is to be the kind of support we’re looking for. Ask us how you can be the best source of support in our lives with diabetes…but please, just don’t ask when our blood sugars are low.

Ginger Vieira has lived with Type 1 diabetes and Celiac disease since 1999. She is the author of Dealing with Diabetes Burnout, Emotional Eating with Diabetes and Your Diabetes Science Experiment. Ginger is the Editorial Director at DiabetesDaily.

http://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/2012/06/non-diabetics-guide-to-helping-loved-ones-with-diabetes/

What’s it Like to Date Someone with Type 1 Diabetes?

by Diabetes Center Miami |

Dating a person with type 1 diabetes brings some very unique challenges to any relationship. In this article in DiabetesDaily.com by Ginger Viera, Heidi shares her story.

Ginger: When you first began dating, did you know about his type 1 diabetes from the start or was it introduced at some point?

Heidi: I knew from the very first date. We were up too late talking like teenagers and he realized his blood was low. He excused himself to get a glass of milk and a snack. I had known him as a friend for an entire year prior. I did not know. I don’t think he would have told me right away, but the circumstances brought it to light early on.

Ginger: When you learned about his diabetes, how did you feel? Did it change anything about how you perceived him in a negative or positive way?

Heidi: I felt embarrassed that I did not know or recognize the signs that his blood sugar was low. I asked him if I should have noticed. The knowledge did not change how I felt emotionally. It did make me want to be educated.

Ginger: Was he open to talking about and teaching you about his diabetes?

Heidi: No. He wasn’t particularly open to talk about his diabetes. He was diagnosed at age 36 (he is now 44) and I truly feel he wrestles with the drastic changes that life threw at him. He did, over time, teach me how to recognize his lows, check his blood sugar, and offered suggestions on how to deal with them.

Ginger: In what ways did his diabetes come up in your relationship?

Heidi: Low blood sugar numbers are his biggest concern. He doesn’t recognize that his numbers are plummeting until they are in the 60s or lower. But more so worrisome, are the nighttime lows.

I learned to test his blood at night when I would wake up to him in a full body sweat, hot, and twitchy. I kept my place stocked with juice boxes and snacks.

I’ve woken up to him in convulsions once. Luckily he seems to know to swallow his juice box when a straw is in his mouth.

Once time I called the ambulance because he accidently injected his long acting insulin into a vein. Despite a gigantic snack just before bedtime, his numbers dipped from 120 to 39 in a matter of 20 minutes. I hadn’t fallen asleep yet and noticed his body was feverishly hot. All was fine in the end and no trip to the hospital was needed. He was angry that I called the ambulance. He was upset that he could not control his own body = life.

Ginger: What was one of the most significant things you’ve learned about diabetes through watching him live with it?

Heidi: You can’t pigeon hole people. You can’t pass judgement. I get mad now when I hear people tell him “I thought you weren’t supposed to eat that.” Like myself before I met him, I knew nothing of real importance about diabetes. We hear about the effects of long terms highs, weight issues, etc., but never about their fear of going to sleep, not knowing if they will wake in the morning. It’s terrifying.

Sometimes it doesn’t matter if you do every little thing right. Your body hiccups and things don’t go the way you expect. Like passing out while being intimate or missing work because your two scoops of ice cream with chocolate sauce on top of a big dinner didn’t get you through the night and you missed a half a day’s work.

Ginger: What is one thing you wish you could understand better around diabetes or his diabetes specifically?

Heidi: Why there are not better sources for emotional counseling. I wish I had known him before his diagnosis so I could better understand his feeling of loss. The feeling of loss he has knowing he can’t physically exert himself without worrying about passing out. The loss of knowing he will hear the wake-up alarm each morning.

http://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/2013/06/dating-a-person-with-type-1-diabetes/

Just Dream of Eating Cheesecake & Your Glucose Level Rises

by Diabetes Center Miami |

A seemingly spontaneous rise in blood glucose during the early morning hours – experienced by many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes – is called the dawn phenomenon or dawn effect. The dawn phenomenon is actually the body’s response to an aspect of its own natural rhythms.

The human body, with its wired-in wisdom, releases hormones such as cortisol, catecholamines, and growth hormone during the early morning hours. These hormones help maintain and restore the body’s cells, and they trigger the liver to release glucose. The rising glucose is meant to be regulated by circulating insulin.

Many people with diabetes do not have enough circulating insulin during predawn hours to regulate this end-of-night surge in blood sugar so they are greeted on waking by the rising sun and an elevated morning glucose reading.

Aside from taking insulin in the evening, try the following four tips if upon waking your glucose levels are elevated.

Exercise late in the day. Being active closer to bedtime may lower your blood sugar while you sleep.

Adjust your medication(s). Talk to your physician about tweaking your medication(s) to counter the higher morning readings.

Eat breakfast. When you eat breakfast, your body will tell the predawn glucose-stimulating hormones to give it a rest.

Limit late-night carbs. In the evening, snack on items that have high protein and fat content such as peanut butter, meat, cheese, or nuts. These foods digest more slowly than carbohydrates, keeping glucose levels steadier.

And finally, keep calm and carry on. Stay informed and continue tweaking your diabetes management regimen to get results you and your professional team are satisfied with.

http://www.informationaboutdiabetes.com/lifestyle/lifestyle/the-diabetes-dawn-phenomenon-why-it-happens-what-to-do

Can Dentists Screen for Diabetes? One Study Suggests Yes! They Can.

by Diabetes Center Miami |

“There are more than 8 million people in this country who have diabetes and don’t know it,” said lead study author Sheila Strauss, an associate professor of nursing and co-director of the Statistics and Data Management Core for New York University’s colleges of nursing and dentistry. “Many of these people see a dentist more regularly than they see their primary care provider. If dentists can screen for diabetes, it may help people get treated sooner when we can get better results managing their disease.”

Researchers found that testing for diabetes using blood that appears on the gums during a routine oral cleaning might be just as accurate as a standard screening that gets a blood sample by pricking the finger with a tiny needle.

Worldwide, nearly one in 10 adults had diabetes in 2014, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization.

Most of these people have type 2, once known as adult-onset, diabetes, which is associated with obesity and aging and happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy.

“If the test in this study proves effective with more research, it is going to help get many individuals, especially young adults, who are not going to see a primary care provider unless they are sick,” said Betul Hatipoglu, an endocrinologist and clinical associate professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. “I can also see this helping men in their 30s who don’t see anybody except to get their teeth cleaned, or women who only go to the OB-Gyn to get an annual checkup or prenatal care and don’t think about anything else,” she said.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/03/05/dentists-might-be-able-to-screen-for-diabetes/

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Name:

Email:

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Note: Form is only an appointment request. A Diabetes Center Miami representative will call to confirm an actual appointment date and time.